Blog

Vote Local Day 5: Care About Schools? Vote Local. (ft. Alina Adams)

Vote Local Day 5: Care About Schools? Vote Local. (ft. Alina Adams)_5fbe2d8e15184.jpeg
#GetEducated #VoteLocal Alina Adams Better Conversation New York City Public Schools New York School Talk Politics

Vote Local Day 5: Care About Schools? Vote Local. (ft. Alina Adams)

Vote Local Day 5: Care About Schools? Vote Local. (ft. Alina Adams)

Yes, there is a big national election happening. But if you really want to improve policy in education, we need to #VoteLocal. 

New York School Talk writer and New York City mom Alina Adams joins host Lisa Hollenbach to talk about how this plays out in her city and across the country—and why people who care about education should #GetEducated and focus their voting efforts.

One key takeaway from Adams’ message is that not every parent needs to know the details of every issue. People are busy enough raising families and doing their own jobs. 

Adams says there are better, more efficient ways for you and your neighbors to determine whether a candidate for office understands the issues, their job’s power over the issues, and whether they are listening to the community’s demands and implementing them sufficiently. 

If you have a problem with your school community that is bigger than the school’s administrators’ job, it can be difficult to figure out who you need to contact. Adams’ advice is to go local because that’s almost always where the power over your school district is. You can find your local elected representatives on this federal database

Once you find out who the official with power over your district is, they might not be at all the kind of person you want in that job. Adams has advice on how to understand whether these folks have your family’s interests at heart. 

Bottom line, though, if you don’t have much time (who does?), Adams says knowing elected officials’ attitudes toward and relationships with groups like teachers unions can be a guide. If you know where officials stand, and if they have a track record of working constructively with (but not for) labor groups to improve their sector, you typically have a pro in office whom you can work with. 

Learn more about Adams’ advice by tuning into #VoteLocal above or clicking this link

Highlights

Leave your thought here

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Categories